All About M.E.


 

I recommend this guy if you want top quality sales page. Very professional and does extraordinary work!! Thank you!!!

– Ramjee

Owner, Edubuzz ―Youtube Channel


 

Absolutely amazing and well worth the wait. Will definitely work with Mark again.

Gwendolyn L. Young

G.L. Young Consulting Corporation


 

Hi Mark,

I’m impressed – great work 🙂 Hope we get to work together some more. It’s been a pleasure for me from the start 🙂

James Dock ,

Representative for Dr. James Samhori


 

You can also follow him from one of these social media sites:  Elmo’s Facebook Page, Mark Elmo Ellis’ Google Plus Page , and Elmo’s Twitter Page .

Listing of Services:

  • Sales Letters
  • Donation and Fund Raising Letters
  • Advertising Copy
  • Yellow Page Ads
  • Magazine Display Ads
  • Video Sales Scripts
  • Effective Blog Posts
  • Email Campaigns
  • Banner Ads
  • Marketing Consultations
  • Public Speaking

elmo faceFor Consulting and Copywriting, please contact me here:

elmo033057(at symbol)gmail.com

or call me: (859)797-9560

2 thoughts on “All About M.E.

  1. Hi, I’m wondering why you use the name, Elmo. It doesn’t appear to be your legal name. There was a broadcaster, writer, and consultant named Elmo Ellis. He worked tirelessly over a career of 60+ years to make his legal name, Elmo Ellis, synonymous with quality and integrity in the field of Journalism. Are you aware of this? Google him.

  2. Janet,

    Thanks so much for asking about my name. You’re right, my middle name isn’t really Elmo, it’s Timothy. However, if people call you something for long enough, you get it stuck to you. I am aware of Elmo Ellis the broadcaster, however my name is associated or taken from him an any way. Not only that there’s a fairly popular baseball player named Mark Ellis. Fortunately, since junior high school, I have signed every non legal document Mark “Elmo” Ellis.

    When I was a lad I played trombone constantly. My main competitor for first chair in band was a kid named John Turgeon.

    The “Turge” and I would get to school early 2 days a week to practice duets together. (Poor Mr. Walters, he’d have to get to school early to open up the band room for us.) Anyway, the Turge and I got into an argument about the correct pronunciation of the word “allargando” and I think I finally called him a flat-face duffus or something like that. He looked at me and said…”Oh you…..ELMO! And we both laughed about it and that was that. Or so I thought…

    It went viral in band class that very same day, and over the weeks it stuck to me like stink to a skunk. Before I knew it friends, enemies, teachers and even my own parents called me Elmo. Of course, the name followed me to Merritt Island High where we had a 250 piece marching band and by the only thing they knew me as was ELMO.

    So I joined the Army to see the world and I wound up at Ft. Jackson – Basic Training. There were many wonderful and endearing names my drill sergeants had for me, but none of them were Elmo. I was in paradise! No longer shackled by that stinking moniker! At last I was free to be me. Free – do you hear me?

    However, I wasn’t JUST in the Army, I had auditioned for the U.S. Army Band. In the military, right after you finish basic, you go to a thing called A.I.T. or Advanced Individual Training. Basically, you take a ton of courses in your area of specialization for six months before being sent to your tour of duty. My A.I.T. was a place called The School of Music or SOM. (The military makes acronyms out of everything. If you want to see a funny yet fairly real example of this, watch Robin Williams in the movie Good Morning Vietnam. He uses a string of acronyms that are just hilarious!)

    Anyway, the SOM was on an amphibious naval base in Norfolk VA. Not only did Army bandsmen but Naval bandsmen, and Marine bandsmen went there as well. (The Air Force was the only branch smart enough to avoid that place. Or at least, that’s the way the joke went…)

    After getting my first briefing and set of orders, I was directed to where I was to report to my barracks. Compared to the fire hazards at Jackson, these were 5 star luxury apartments! I couldn’t hardly believe my eyes! Life was actually moving in my direction for once!

    “ELMO! ELMO! ELMO!” Came the shouts from the beautiful building.

    Wha? No! I must be delusional from my brief euphoria. It couldn’t possibly be..

    “”ELMO! ELMO! ELMO!” Came the cries again.

    But how….????

    Turns out that a tuba player named Bill Beam, who I graduated from high school with beat me to the SOM by one cycle. After graduating from there 6 months later, I was sent to Heidelberg, Germany where I was reunited with many of the fine musicians that I already knew from the SOM. And of course, they called me Elmo.

    What else?

    The Germans I made friends with called me Elmo, the Jordanians I met when I went to Amman, Jordan to play a concert for a king, called me Elmo. African Americans who liked my jazz, referred to me as “The Elms”.

    Everyone called me Elmo with the exception of my father, who referred to me as Dumb-a** until the day he died.

    So there you have the epic story of my name. Now, you and the rest of the world can relax. Mystery solved.

    God Bless,

    ELMO

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